Thursday, 27 September 2012

RP No 91 NYW Commanders Schomburg & Schomberg



Frederick Herman the Duke of Schomberg was born on December 16,1615 in Heidelberg, Palatinate. He died on July 1st 1690 at the Battle of the Boyne.
He was a soldier of fortune, a marshal of France and an English peer. Schomberg's father was the Protestant court marshal of Frederick V. elector Palatine. His Mother was Anne, daughter of the English peer -the 5th Lord Dudley.
He served under Frederick Henry of Orange in 1633 and under Bernard of Saxe-Weimar during the 30 years war from 1634-1637 in the campaigns on the Upper Rhine. He went to Holland again for service in 1639. In 1650 he served for Cardinal Mazarin in the cri sis of the Frond-He served at the battle of Rethel on Dec. 15,1650. Schomberg became marechal de camp on Oct.28,1652 and fought for Turenne against the Spaniards and the Prince de Conde.
 In 1660 he organized a Portuguese army against Spain. He place Dom Pedro in power during a palace revolution and returned to the French army in 1668 having become naturalized as a Frenchman. Schombeg went to England in 1673 to aid Chales II in the forma tion of an army for an invasion of Holland but then returned to the French army to be on hand with Louis XIV at the siege and capture of Maastrict (June 1673). When Turenne died in 1675 he became one of 8 Marshals of France.
 When the Edict of Nantes was revoked in 1685 Shomberg, a protestant , left France.He was taken in by Frederick William of Brandenburn, "the Great Elector". In 1688 he was lent together with a Prussian force to William of Orange. He went to England and was naturalized as English in April 1689 and was made Duke of Schomberg in May (also made the baron of Teyes, Earl of Brentford and Marquess of Harwich). He was the Commander in Chief of the Williamite forces against James' Jacobite forces from August 1689, he was killed at the Battle of the Boyne leading his troops forward into action east of Oldbridge.







 Meinhardt Schomberg  had a very colourful military career pre to the war in Ireland, he joined his father in the service of the Portuguese Army in the 1660’s and served as a lieutenant-colonel and then as a colonel.  He then joined French service and attained the rank of brigadier and, afterwards, Maréchal de Camp.  He fought under Marshal François de Créquy at the Battle of Kochersburg in October 1677, the Battle of Freiburg im Breisgau in 14 November 1677, at the Battle of Rheinfelden in July 1678 and at the Battle of Kinzing later that month, before serving under Frederick William, Elector of Brandenburg as a general of cavalry.
He then travelled to England in Spring 1689 and was made colonel of Lord Cavendish's Regiment of Horse on 10 April 1690, and commissioned a general of the horse on 19 April 1690.
 Schomberg commanded the right wing of William's army during the Battle of the Boyne and led the crucial crossing of the River Boyne at Roughgrange near Rosnaree on the Jacobites' flank, the turning point in the confrontation, despite a gallant defence by Sir Neil O'Neill and his men. O’Neill fell during the fighting and his men fled. Schomberg then engaged in a pursuit of the retreating troops towards Duleek,  there were no casualties amongst his regiment's soldiers.  
He was created Duke of Leinster for his part in the Battle on 30 June 1690 and, after taking part in the abortive Siege of Limerick in August 1690, he became a British subject through naturalization by Act of Parliament on 25 April 1691. From May 1691 he was also made Commander-in-Chief of the Forces during the King's travels in Flanders.  In Spring 1693 Schomberg was placed in command of the abortive descent on Saint-Malo and in October 1693 he inherited the title of Duke of Schomberg following the death of his younger brother Charles Schomberg at the Battle of Marsaglia.





49 comments:

  1. Very beautiful...and once again digging the history lesson!

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  2. Nicely done Ray everything looks good. It always does. When I see your figures I think about doing a colourful period with nice uniforms but I already have to many unfinished projects so I can't really start a new one.

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  3. Sir, you are turning into a painting machine! Very nice.

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  4. Really fine work Ray. Again with the hat waving.

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  5. Nice work again Ray, you are very good at painting these little little dudes

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  6. Schomburg & Schomberg? Sounds like a couple of German ambulance chasers to me! ;)

    Lovely work again, Ray

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  7. Fun stuff! I've always been drawn to this period

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  8. Once again a really fine work Ray!

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  9. You're getting better and better at this Ray and I think you may have missed your calling in life. You should be teaching history.

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    Replies
    1. I always wanted to, but never had the time or chance :0(

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  10. I have to agree with Anne.. I do feel like these articles are a bit of a lesson in history.. and that you have a knack for it.. great job here!

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  11. I agree too. Great post Ray. Nice fig's and lovely paintwork.

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  12. Nice work mate. they are really good

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  13. Great looking command stands. The Da did good, getting to 75 and still not dying of natural causes, not many would get even close!

    Ian

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    1. He did have a fair innings for the times, especailly concidering his career of choice!

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  14. another informative post, thanks. ;)

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  15. Fabulous Work! What size base are you using for that?

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    1. The large base is 60mm and the smaller one is 50mm both are from Warbases.

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  16. Very nice looking command groups (dig the history lesson too)

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  17. That grenadier is a nice touch on the fist one.

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    Replies
    1. A great use for spare, left over figures!

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  18. Great paintmanship, Sir Ray!

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  19. Good Lord Ray, you're on fire at the moment, must be getting close to the painting challenge again!

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    Replies
    1. Yep, but I'm running out of things to paint!!

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  20. Again a really nice work Ray!
    Regards
    Bruno

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  21. Interesting post as usual Ray ;-)
    NYW is an interesting period but at present I' m busy with 28mm ECW and 10mm WWI...even if I' m tempted by the WSS...in 28mm...:-)

    Marzio.

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  22. Very nice!
    The gabions, are made by you?

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    1. No, not made by me, these come from Magister Militum.

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  23. Good stuff Ray. I really like the posing on the stands and the history lesson was very informative.

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  24. Great job, Ray. After reading this post I do wonder, who was Portugal fighting in the 1660's?

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    Replies
    1. It was the Spanish in the Portuguese Restoration War, 1640-68.

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    2. When do you start painting those armies?

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    3. The Jacobites back in May this year, but the others back in September 2010.

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  25. Excellent command stands again Ray!

    Greetings
    Peter
    http://peterscave.blogspot.be/

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  26. Hey.. nice background. Had I been focusing so much on the figures that I missed it? I'll check..

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  27. Lovely pieces and great work on the background info!

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  28. The backdrop and historical write-up adds to those superb looking figures.

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  29. Thanks Ray I like them to but man that command stand is so cool great job

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  30. Another nice vignette Ray with good bit of history to back it up!

    Christopher

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  31. A fine looking command base, like the touch with the Grenadier added

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  32. I am so impressed by the detail in your painting. Especially in the first picture, just amazing!

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  33. Excellent, Ray. And, as ever, a very good piece of history. Thank you a lot for that!

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  34. Good stuff Ray, the galloping horse is great on that vignette

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